The Hate U Give

The Hate U Give

Book - 2017
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After witnessing her friend's death at the hands of a police officer, Starr Carter's life is complicated when the police and a local drug lord try to intimidate her in an effort to learn what happened the night Kahlil died.
Publisher: New York, NY : Balzer + Bray, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers, [2017]
Edition: First edition.
Copyright Date: ©2017
ISBN: 9780062498533
0062498533
9780062871350
9781406387162
9780062872340
0062872346
Call Number: TEEN FIC THO
Characteristics: 444 pages ; 22 cm
Alternative Title: Hate you give

Opinion

From Library Staff

Teen: A deep look into a teen dealing with racial profiling, finding her voice and learning to speak up for herself, her friend and her community after her friend was killed by a police officer during a traffic stop while she was with him.

"After witnessing her friend's death at the hands of a police officer, Starr Carter's life is complicated when the police and a local drug lord try to intimidate her in an effort to learn what happened the night Kahlil died."

Comment
IndyPL_NicoleN Oct 29, 2018

This book is very relevant to today's current events of racial profiling and police brutality that make it into the news. Starr, a teenager, deals with tragedy as best as she can. Along the way she learns how to stand up and make her voice heard.

Comment
IndyPL_ShelbyP Nov 20, 2018

This book hits home with how real it feels. It is very eye opening and moving to read a story that addresses something that is relevant in our society today in a first person perspective, even if it is a fictional one. While there were times I wanted to cry because of the sadness I felt for Starr... Read More »


From the critics


Community Activity

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1
1Love2learn
Aug 03, 2020

Wow. What a great read. Be aware, lots of swearing, but it realistically captures people's preconceived notions of race and the effects of actions and words. If you are white, you should read this. It may bring awareness to things you never considered offensive. Which character do you most identify with? If it is Hailey, you may wish to re-examine your values.

s
Sarahcc4
Aug 01, 2020

The Hate U Give is a compelling, insightful, and heartbreaking read. Angie Thomas explores issues of racism, code-switching, police brutality, and the challenges of teen life in this novel. The author returns explains the title and returns to its message throughout the book. The main character, Starr, is only sixteen, but has witnessed two of her best friends die--one from street violence and one from police brutality. While dealing with her grief, she learns who her true friends are (and are not), wrestles with her identity, and finds her voice. I highly recommend this book.

j
jahughes_0
Jul 28, 2020

Starr Carter, the narrator and witness to the murder of her friend in a police shooting, provides the questions and clarity of youth to a story that so many people of all ages are struggling with. "What side of ourselves do we present to a stranger?" and "How do we keep ourselves safe?" are universal questions. Starr asks those questions everyday and adds race into the equation, trying to make sure she is in control and never gives anyone a reason to doubt her. Her journey to reconcile justice, with the weight of racial prejudice, is a battle to have the truth heard. Starr is a character that has to find the bravery to stand against racism on large and small scales.
The Hate U Give is a must read for all ages. Published in 2017, its relevance and power have, unfortunately, only grown since then. Angie Thomas has grounded and expertly explored the flesh and blood issue of the death of POC, especially black men, at the hands of police officers. Thomas, like Starr does at the end of the book, uses her voice as her weapon and hits hard. I as a privileged white female, felt the punches and the patience that Thomas had to give.
No matter your age or race, in 2020 I hope if our nonfiction reality hasn't moved you to find your bravery to stand up, this book is a great place to start.

a
amysell
Jul 27, 2020

I loved this book. You could really feel the tension that Starr lived with between her home life and school life. As I read it this summer, unfortunately it was timely all over again. I have suggested this book to many youth, especially young white students heading off to college. This was so relevant to what is going on. I really loved how she became an activist at the end and found her voice. This is something all young black and brown students need to be able to do, but also all young people need to be given a chance to find their voices. I was so glad Starr found hers!

Hillsboro_RobP Jul 19, 2020

Compelling in every moment, alive in every character, and real in every dialogue. Perhaps one of the most important works of fiction to come out in recent memory. It should be read.

b
Bushra_20
Jul 18, 2020

In THE HATE U GIVE, Starr Carter is a teen between two worlds: her school, which is rich, fancy, and white; and her neighborhood, which is poor and black. She navigates this differing terrain every day of her life until her worlds collide when she witnesses the fatal police shooting of her best friend, Khalil, an unarmed black teen. Khalil's death goes viral, and Starr is caught in the middle between the protesters in the street and her friends at school. With the eyes of the world on her, Starr has to decide: Will she say what happened that night? Will it matter?

The characters in the book are rich, complex, and fully developed. They feel like family, friends, and neighbors, and they give those unfamiliar with life in urban centers an understanding that the setting may be specific but the human condition is the universal. The tragedy and triumph of Thomas' stellar work is that it's very real and heartbreakingly familiar. Teens will enjoy the book for its unfiltered look at life, death, grief, and social and political commentary, while parents and teachers will enjoy the book's well-written and thorough approach to a complex social issue.

0Charlie Jul 14, 2020

Scary but probably realistic telling of living in a poor black neighbourhood. A teenage girl is the sole witness to a killing of a black friend by a white cop. The strength of the family and community throbs throughout the struggles she endures. Hope remains as not all problems are solved by the end. A powerful and necessary read for teens and adults alike.

h
haileynoa
Jul 13, 2020

After witnessing her best friend Khalil get murdered by the police, 16-year-old Starr Carter learns to find her voice to demand justice for not only Khalil but for all of those who suffer from oppression and police brutality. Following his shooting, Starr finds herself, learns who her real friends are, and tries to make sense of the world with the help of her family. This story gives perspective on police brutality and the everyday struggles of black Americans. It is a story about community and standing up for what you believe in, even if the very thought of doing so is terrifying. Starr’s story is realistic, emotional, and empowering. Angie Thomas’s writing hit me with anger, laughter, and tears. I’ve learned so much from this book and though it is aimed for teens, I think adults would find this book very interesting as well. I believe that everyone should take the time to read this book because it is definitely worth it. I feel that it is destined to become a classic for many generations in the future because of its important message.

c
CareyMacaulay
Jul 10, 2020

Read this for the story.
Read this for the characters.
Read this for the, tragically, timely message.
Read this to see yourself.
Read this to change the way you see.
Read this and pass it along to someone you love.
Read this and stand up for education, equality, and justice.
Read this.

m
melodia1988
Jul 08, 2020

I learned so much from this book.

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Age

Add Age Suitability
h
haileynoa
Jul 13, 2020

haileynoa thinks this title is suitable for 13 years and over

v
violet_dog_11845
Jul 03, 2020

violet_dog_11845 thinks this title is suitable for 11 years and over

n
NCHACHOU
Jun 06, 2020

NCHACHOU thinks this title is suitable for 12 years and over

p
pink_swan_291
Jun 02, 2020

pink_swan_291 thinks this title is suitable for 11 years and over

z
zellisthebest
May 22, 2020

zellisthebest thinks this title is suitable for 12 years and over

m
miraellie
Apr 08, 2020

miraellie thinks this title is suitable for 14 years and over

p
PiggyReads
Mar 23, 2020

PiggyReads thinks this title is suitable for 99 years and over

e
Ethiopianwolf
Jan 01, 2020

Ethiopianwolf thinks this title is suitable for 16 years and over

w
white_wolf_1351
Oct 09, 2019

white_wolf_1351 thinks this title is suitable for 15 years and over

r
red_dog_23465
Aug 21, 2019

red_dog_23465 thinks this title is suitable for 11 years and over

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Notices

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z
zellisthebest
May 22, 2020

Other: Racism.

z
zellisthebest
May 22, 2020

Sexual Content: Talks about sex.

z
zellisthebest
May 22, 2020

Violence: Rioting, Shootings

z
zellisthebest
May 22, 2020

Coarse Language: A lot of swear words.

b
blue_eagle_2085
Mar 09, 2019

Sexual Content: Nothing actually happens but it's implied.

b
blue_eagle_2085
Mar 09, 2019

Violence: Shootings, police brutality

b
blue_eagle_2085
Mar 09, 2019

Coarse Language: Lots of curse words.

d
donutwombat
Aug 27, 2017

Violence: Witness of murder

c
CYU_BJ
Aug 01, 2017

Violence: police shooting, vivid description of a friend's death

c
CYU_BJ
Aug 01, 2017

Coarse Language: extreme profanity, but not to the extent that teenagers can't handle

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Quotes

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c
CareyMacaulay
Jul 10, 2020

"'Brave doesn’t mean you’re not scared, Starr,' she says. 'It means you go on even though you’re scared. And you’re doing that.'”

c
CareyMacaulay
Jul 10, 2020

"That’s the problem. We let people say stuff, and they say it so much that it becomes okay to them and normal for us. What’s the point of having a voice if you’re gonna be silent in those moments you shouldn’t be?"

c
CareyMacaulay
Jul 10, 2020

"'Sometimes you can do everything right and things will still go wrong. The key is to never stop doing right.’”

m
melodia1988
Jul 09, 2020

"You have to decide if the relationship is worth salvaging. Make a list of the good stuff, then make a list of the bad stuff. If one outweighs the other, then you know what you gotta do. Trust me, that method hasn't failed me yet."

m
melodia1988
Jul 08, 2020

"Sometimes things will go wrong, but the key is to keep doing right."

m
miraellie
Apr 08, 2020

“Sometimes you can do everything right and things will still go wrong. The key is to never stop doing right.”

CMLibrary_gjd Mar 24, 2019

pg 17 But even if I grew up in it, I wouldn't understand fighting over streets nobody owns.

pg 65 Khalil matters to us, not the stuff he did

pg 165 Her words (Mom) used to have power. If she said it was fine, it was fine. But after you've held two people as they took their last breaths, words like that don't mean shit anymore.

l
LexiLou2
Jan 08, 2019

We let people say stuff, and they say it so much that it becomes okay to them and normal for us. What's the point of having a voice if you're gonna be silent in those moments you shouldn't be?

s
shayshortt
Apr 18, 2017

It seems like they always talk about what he may have said, what he may have done, what he may not have done. I didn’t know a dead person could be charged in his own murder, you know?

Summary

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a
auri_12
Feb 08, 2019

Starr, the young lady, had a somewhat difficult life. In school she was one person but at home and in her neighborhood she was another. One weekend she went out with her friend. Then she saw an old friend,Khalil, and they just danced. Khalil and Starr then left the party and Khalil was driving Starr home. They got pulled over and the officer had Khalil come out the car while Starr had her hands on the dashboard because her father had taught her what to do in case of these things since she is black. Khalil was joking around and reached into the car and the officer got scared and shot him. That's where it started, Starr was very upset and scared. She was scared to talk about what happened since Khalil was in a gang and the gang would come after her even if the main one was her uncle. A lot happened after that but Starr got the courage and finally stood for what was right.

s
shayshortt
Apr 18, 2017

Starr Carter is a girl with a foot in two worlds. By day, she attends Williamson, a suburban prep school where she is one of only two black students in her year. In the evening, she goes home to Garden Heights, the city’s poor, black neighbourhood, where she has lived all her life. She is one person at home and another person at school, because she can’t be too “bougie” in the neighbourhood, or too “ghetto” at school. But the wall she has carefully built between her two selves begins to crumble when she is the only witness to a police officer shooting and killing her childhood friend, Khalil. The killing gains national headlines as protestors take to the streets to protest the murder of yet another unarmed black boy. In the day’s following Khalil’s death, Starr faces a choice between remaining silent, and speaking up. But even if she can find her voice, will it be enough to get justice for Khalil?

SPL_Brittany Apr 09, 2017

"Sometimes you can do everything right and things will still go wrong. The key is to never stop doing right."

Sixteen year old Starr moves between two worlds: the poor neighbourhood where she lives and the affluent high school she attends. The uneasy balance is shattered when she becomes a witness to the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend Khalil, at the hands of a police officer. Khalil was black, unarmed, and doing nothing wrong.

Soon afterwards, the media gains interest, and Khalil’s death becomes a national headline. Some are calling him a thug, a gangbanger even a drug dealer. While the police don’t seem interested in finding out what really happened, rioting begins and protesters take to the streets in Khalil’s name, as his death ignites long held tensions between the black community and their treatment by the police.

Throughout, Starr struggles with her identity as her two worlds collide. Her fear is palpable as she confronts system that she knows is working against her. She’s afraid to speak out yet worries that if she does not Khalil’s murderer could escape justice. Will she find her voice for Khalil?

Angie Thomas writes a beautiful, timely and emotionally charged novel about a teenage girl dealing with very real and complex relationships. Thomas confronts issues of race and class sending an incredibly powerful message to readers as well as those wanting to understand the blacklivesmatter movement. Her writing style and characters will engage you from page one, and will have readers falling in love with the entire Carter family. An engrossing and refreshing read, it is hard to believe that this is Thomas’s first novel, already the rights have been given for this to be made into a feature film.

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